Origins of Rage

As her senses fill with the rotten stink of death, she looks down at the blood dripping from the knife in her shaking hands. “Oh god, what have I done?” echoes the single thought.

The dreams are starting again. And twenty-six-year-old Melanie Morris should be used to them by now. As the loner “girl who dreams murders” and helps authorities stop or solve them through her psychically inspired paintings, she has lots of experience.

But this dream is different. Why does she feel sorry for the murderer?

Working alongside Brody Carter—a longtime friend and the youngest ever Sheriff of Arrow Springs, Kansas, who makes her heart pound and parts of her libido that have never been tested dance in time to the thumping—they follow the dream clues, hoping to find the killer before another life is lost and Mel is left with more blood on her conscience. But the deeper Mel gets into this dream sequence, the more its twists and turns bring up Mel’s tragic past—bringing her worst fear to the forefront. The fear that one day a murderer she dreams about will come after her.

Melanie Morris is 25 years old and dreams of murders that haven’t happened.

Throughout the course of the dream sequence, she wakes up and paints the dreams.

She once had a dream that involved someone she loved being murdered. All while the dreams were happening that person was safe in their bed, until they weren’t.

It was the one time that she was able to see the killer as he looked in the mirror of the vehicle that would be the place where her loved one would take their last breath.  Now she vows to never ignore a dream. She doesn’t know that this dream might bring her worst fear to the forefront and could possibly give her the greatest gift she never knew she wanted.

"When the deed was done...

the killer drove his car out to the country, to an old house-white, with peeling paint and green shutters. Out front was an old mailbox standing on a plain wooden post. On top of the roof, an old rooster weathervane squeaked loudly as it spun around and around in the wind.”